Report | Fact Sheet

ACEEE

Potential non-lighting energy and operational benefits associated with advanced lighting controls (ALCs) and provides decision makers with a justification to specify integrated building systems.

DOE Solid-State Lighting Program

Interoperability and system integration: System performance is a function of how well devices work together, and common platforms and protocols are needed to enable the exchange of usable data between lighting systems, other systems, the internet, and cloud services.  Study results and webinar on connected lighting system interoperability.

Better Buildings / Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

This fact sheet covers the potential for deeper energy savings and occupant comfort through the integration of lighting controls and automated shading. Research conducted by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory found an annual energy savings up to 30% in controlled zones compared to a baseline lighting system. Furthermore, occupant comfort (i.e., non-energy benefit) potential was identified, as the system maintained an acceptable level of Daylight Glare Probability at almost all times and maintained illuminance at the workplane at all times.

UC Davis: California Lighting Technology Center

The California Lighting Technology Center, in collaboration with the California Energy Commission, is conducting research to develop and evaluate technology that integrates automated controls for HVAC, electric lighting and dynamic fenestration systems.

DOE | National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

This paper describes emerging plug and process load technologies, the characteristics necessary for successful integration into EMIS platforms, and research questions the U.S. Department of Energy and the national laboratories can pursue to rapidly advance the state of the art.

Lighting System Integration with HVAC and Plug Loads: Tinker Air Force Base

Department of Energy

This is a case study for the Tinker Air Force Base. By replacing the existing lighting with LED fixtures, this project saved more than 60% energy compared to the existing technology. This is consistent with savings of converting either fluorescent or high-intensity discharge fixtures with either new LED fixtures or retrofit kits, which typically result in at least 45% savings. The lighting controls saved between 8-23% compared to the LED baseline. Because LEDs are very efficient, the new LED baseline uses less energy. As a result, the 20%+ savings does not result in sufficient savings for a reasonable payback. However, using lighting controls to control other building systems can make the lighting and control system more cost effective.

DOE | Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

Learn more about the possibilities that can be leveraged when the lighting controls and sensors are connected either to other building systems or a digital network.